What if I Can’t Afford a Lawyer?

Represent Yourself

Representing yourself in court is never advised, but it has been done, generally only occurring in small civil trials. If you do decide to represent yourself, it is crucial to learn the law and rules that apply to your case. Although deciding to represent yourself is an option, you are expected to know and follow all the same laws and court rules as an attorney.

 

Legal AidLegal Aid

Legal aid is in reference to any service which provides legal assistance to those unable to afford it otherwise. There are many organizations which provide legal aid, given you meet their guidelines for assistance. When searching for legal aid through clinics or specialized law firms, there are often income and resource restrictions to prevent people from taking advantage of their services who don’t legitimately qualify for free legal services. Although you may be considered a low-income family, sometimes the restrictions are much lower. One other option you may look into is searching for an individual pro bono attorney. In fact, the American Bar Association (ABA) recommends that all lawyers in the United States donate fifty hours of pro bono service a year.

 

Contingency Case

There are several methods and various factors attorneys use to set their fees. Some lawyers work based on contingency, meaning they take a percentage of your settlement or judgment amount rather than charging the client upfront. When searching for an attorney, look for those that charge on contingency or ask them about it.

 

A Free Consultation

If you are involved in a matter requiring legal assistance, we highly advise you to set up a free consultation with one of our experienced attorneys today at the Cochran Firm New York. We will sit down one-on-one to discuss your specific case and what options you may have. You may decide not to go forward with us, but at least you will have explored the option. Call (212) 553-9215.